Spring cleaning noodles.

The calendar is saying it’s spring, but other than the rare gorgeous day it’s still pretty rainy and cool here in Vancouver.  It’s the time of year when I’m itching to get outside but from experience I know it’s still a bit early to start planting much in the garden.  So instead I’ve resorted to that other ubiquitous spring activity.  Cleaning.

Spring really is on it's way!

Simple Fall Carrots.

Sometimes dinner rolls around and you just don’t want to get fancy.  Maybe you don’t have the time or the ingredients.  Maybe you just want something simple and clean.   Summer or winter Peter Rabbit got it right.  It’s hard to beat fresh carrots.

For an easy vegetable dish try steamed carrots with butter and sage.  It’s simple.

Instructions

  • First, pick some carrots fresh from the garden (or Mr. McGregors).

Or grab a bunch from the farmers market.

  • Cut them to your preferred size.  Place in the top half of a vegetable steamer and cook until just tender.
  • While they are cooking melt a tbsp of butter in a saute pan and add a handful of chopped fresh sage.
  • Let the sage get a bit crispy, but be careful it doesn’t burn.
  • When the carrots are cooked, drain them and place in the pan with the butter and sage.  Toss.
  • Sprinkle lightly with sea salt and fresh ground pepper to taste.

Serve the carrots hot, warm or even cold the next day.  It is just as good for dinner with a roast chicken as it is with quinoa for a quick lunch.  Just don’t get caught in the garden!

How to peel a tomato.

This was not the post I planned for today.  But then something happened.

Yesterday, as I was prepping 40lbs of beautiful field tomatoes for the freezer a friend innocently asked  “is that how you peel tomatoes?”.  It was then that I realized that every year when I freeze tomatoes (or peaches) I get the same question.

So folks,  here ya go.

First.  Get some tomatoes.

Next, boil some water in a large pot and set a large bowl of cold water next to the stove.  When the water is boiling use a slotted spoon and place them into the water.

Watch them until the skin splits.  As soon as the skin splits use a slotted spoon to remove the tomatoes and place them in the cold bowl of water.

Place the bowl in sink, and if the water has warmed add more cold water.  It is important not to let the tomatoes actually cook at this stage.  You just want to be able to peel the skin.

Peel off the skin.

That’s it.  You’re done.

What you do now is up to you.  You could leave them whole, core them, slice them, quarter them, mash them, seed and puree them, your options are endless.  This batch I just quartered and put into freezer bags.

Now they just sit in the freezer and wait for the winter rains as a little mealtime reminder that summer always comes back.